This page contains pictures of some of the animals that I saw in Borneo. The pictures of the flora in Borneo are on a separate flora page.

The highlight in Borneo are the Orangutans, the second largest of the Great Apes. I visited the Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Center in Sandakan to see my first Northeast Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus morio, german: Borneo-Orang-Utan, french: Orang-outan de Bornéo). Here they raise young Orangutans that were rescued from illegal pet trade or found abandoned after poachers killed the mother. There they learn to live in the wild. If they are successful, they are released in the jungle. Sepilok has feedings at 10:00 and at 15:00, during which times you are basically guaranteed to see Orangutans (and other monkeys who steal the food from the Orangutans). I went to the 10:00 feeding with my guide. I was free for the afternoon, so I went to the 15:00 feeding as well. At the first feeding I saw only one Orangutan, at the afternoon feeding there were seven of them that were much more active.

Another highlight was watching a Green Sea Turtle lay her eggs in the Turtle Islands Marine Park. The three Malaysian Turtle Islands in the Marine Park, Pulau Selingaan, Pulau Gulisan, and Pulau Bakkungan Kecil, are a nesting area for Green Sea Turtles (Chelonia mydas, german: Grüne Meeresschildkröte, french: Tortue verte) and Hawksbill Sea Turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata, german: Echte Karettschildkröte, french: Tortue imbriquée). Since the nesting seasons for these two species are complimentary, you can watch sea turtles laying eggs basically all year long. The park rangers on the three islands monitor the beaches on these three islands every night for egg-laying females. While the turtles lay their eggs, the park rangers collect them, so the turtle covers an empty hole after she is done laying her eggs. The eggs are then transferred to a fenced hatching area for incubation. Once the baby turtles hatch, they are transferred back to the beach and released. My first question was: "Why don't you raise them for a while till they are big enough, so they have a better chance to survive". The simple answer is that they loose their migration instinct if they grow up in a fenced enclosure. They do not leave the island to grow up in the ocean and then return after some years to mate and lay eggs.

Each evening, the rangers select one nesting turtle for watching by tourists. The rangers briefed us in detail about what we can and cannot do, in order to not disturb the turtle during egg laying. The danger there is that she will abandon the egg laying and return to the ocean if she is disturbed. During the egg laying everybody has to stay behind the turtle so she cannot see us. Noise does not seem to be a problem, but flash photography is, so no flash. I was surprised that this really worked while I was there. Usually there are always a couple of klutzes who can't handle their camera and flash anyway, but this was not the case this time.

Once the egg laying is finished, the turtle will start covering the hole with sand. By that time, the ranger has already removed all the eggs, so the turtle covers an empty hole. The turtle that I was watching laid 97 eggs. At this time you can move around to the front of the turtle to take pictures (still no flash).

Egg laying is very strenuous for turtles and takes a long time. They take some ½ hour to find a spot for a nest. They then dig a hole for about one hour, lay eggs for ½ hour, and then cover the hole for another hour. Then they have the ½ hour trek back to the ocean. One female usually comes back to the beach 6-7 times in one season. She then goes back to the deep ocean for 2-3 years, before returning for another egg laying season. All the turtles are marked with metal tags when they lay eggs for the first time, and the rangers keep track of which turtle lays eggs when and how many.

One important draw for me were the primates, and in particular the apes. During my trip to Borneo I saw two more of the Apes species, Northeast Bornean Orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus morio, german: Borneo-Orang-Utan, french: Orang-outan de Bornéo) and North Bornean Gray Gibbon (Hylobates funereus, german: Müller-Gibbon, french: Gibbon de Müller). The Orangutans are the second largest of the Great Apes (after the Gorilla), the Gibbons are the smallest of the Apes. The Gibbons are purely arboreal, they never go to the ground. They are fantastic acrobats in the trees, and can easily leap between trees.

With these two species I have seen all but one of the Apes species in the wild (Northeast Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus morio, german: Borneo-Orang-Utan, french: Orang-outan de Bornéo), Mountain Gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei, german: Berggorilla, french: Gorille des montagnes), Eastern Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii, german: Gemeiner Schimpanse, french: Chimpanzé commun), and North Bornean Gray Gibbon (Hylobates funereus, german: Müller-Gibbon, french: Gibbon de Müller)). The only one missing is the Bonobo (Pan paniscus, german: Bonobo, french: Bonobo) (which wasn't a separate species when I was a child).

Other animals to see in the various rain forest areas in Borneo are many species of monkeys, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and insects.

The strangest looking of the primates is the the Proboscis Monkey (Nasalis larvatus, german: Nasenaffe, french: Long-nez), a species endemic to Borneo. Other monkeys are the Long-tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis, german: Javaneraffe, french: Macaque crabier), the Sunda Pig-tailed Macaque (Macaca nemestrina, german: Südlicher Schweinsaffe, french: Macaque à queue de cochon des îles de la Sonde), and the Silver Leaf Monkey or Silver Langur (Trachypithecus cristatus, german: Silberner Haubenlangur, french: Semnopithèque à coiffe), the Maroon Leaf Monkey, or Maroon Langur (Presbytis rubicunda, german: Maronenlangur, french: Semnopithèque rubicond). I also so the Bornean Tarsier (Cephalopachus bancanus borneanus, german: Sunda-Koboldmaki, french: Tarsier de Bornéo). These night-active animals are very difficult to spot, because their eyes do not reflect light like those of most of the other animals do. They are therefore very difficult to locate.

In the Tabin Reserve I saw quite a few larger mammals during the night drives. I saw Bornean and Sumatran Leopard Cats (Prionailurus javanensis sumatranus, german: Sundakatze), several species of civet, and flying squirrels and Sunda Flying Lemurs (Galeopterus variegatus, german: Malaien-Gleitflieger, french: Galéopithèque de Temminck), no relation to the lemurs in Madagascar.

Reptiles are mostly lizards, but also some snakes. Most impressive here was the Southeast Asian Water Monitor (Varanus salvator macromaculatus, german: Bindenwaran, french: Varan malais), which can grow to impressive lengths. I saw a couple of them that were over 2 m (7 ft) long.

Amphibians are mostly out at night. I saw several species of frogs, including the strange looking Long-nosed Horned Frog (Megophrys nasuta, german: Zipfelkrötenfrosch, french: Grenouille cornue asiatique).

There are lots of insects in the rain forest. The strangest looking one was the Pill Bug Millipede (Zephroniidae gen.) and the Lantern Bug (Pyrops sidereus).

All pictures are © Dr. Günther Eichhorn, unless otherwise noted.

Fauna in Borneo

Earth Worm Tower
Earth worm tower. (548k)
Honey Bees Nest
Honey bees nest. (685k)
Insect Eggs Leaf
Insect eggs on a leaf. (560k)
Firefly
Firefly. (452k)
Dark Channel Left Side
The dark channel on the left side of the rattan stalk is a covered nest of ants. When you shake the plant, the ants make a rhythmic loud noise for about 10 seconds. This was really weird to hear. (752k)
Ants Nest
Ants nest. (674k)
Dinomyrmex gigas
Giant Ant (Dinomyrmex gigas, german: Camponotus gigas). These ants are about 2-3 cm (0.8-1.2") long. They are fairly docile, they do not attack easily. (662k)
Cricket
Cricket. (489k)
Cricket
Cricket. (594k)
Grasshopper
Grasshopper. (888k)
Large Cricket
Large cricket. (420k)
Blind Cave Cricket Bat
Blind cave cricket in the bat cave. They have enormously long antenna that they use to orient themselves in the dark. (949k)
Wasp
Wasp. (475k)
Mating Stick Insects
Mating stick insects. (446k)
Praying Mantis
Praying mantis. (472k)
Praying Mantis
Praying mantis. (515k)
Odonata
Dragonfly (Order Odonata, suborder Anisoptera). (535k)
Odonata
Dragonfly (Order Odonata, suborder Anisoptera). (542k)
Odonata
Dragonfly (Order Odonata, suborder Anisoptera). (598k)
Odonata
Dragonfly (Order Odonata, suborder Anisoptera). (711k)
Spider Web After Rain
Spider web after the rain. (672k)
Crab Spider
Crab spider. (496k)
Daddy Longlegs
Daddy Longlegs. (599k)
Large Ground Spider
Large ground spider. (731k)
Sparassidae gen.
Huntsman Spider (Sparassidae gen., german: Riesenkrabbenspinnen). (686k)
Tarantula
Tarantula. (503k)
Beetle
Beetle. (886k)
Sap-sucking Beetle
Sap-sucking beetle. (564k)
Beetle
Beetle. (760k)
Scarabaeidae gen.
Scarab Beetle (Scarabaeidae gen., german: Blatthornkäfer, french: Scarabée). (750k)
Chalcosoma moellenkampi
Three-horned Rhinoceros Beetle (Chalcosoma moellenkampi). (544k)
Pyrops sidereus
Lantern Bug (Pyrops sidereus). Notice the lizard sitting right behind it. I saw that a couple of times, but the lizards did not seem to hunt them. (475k)
Pyrops sidereus
Lantern Bugs (Pyrops sidereus). (595k)
Cicada Extremely Loud Loudest
Cicada. Some of them were extremely loud. The loudest one was probably the 6 o'clock cicada. It starts to make noise every evening at just about 18:00 till sunset. (477k)
Millipede
Millipede. (733k)
Zephroniidae gen.
Pill Bug Millipede (Zephroniidae gen.). They are really big in Borneo. This one was about 10 cm (4") long. (661k)
Zephroniidae gen.
Pill Bug Millipede (Zephroniidae gen.). When you disturb a pill bug, it rolls into a ball. This ball was about 3 cm (1.2") in diameter. (528k)
Centipede Guys Venomous Opposed
Centipede. These guys are venomous (as opposed to the millipedes, which are harmless). (579k)
Haemadipsa picta
Tiger Leech (Haemadipsa picta, german: Tigeregel). (385k)
Leech Had Found Way
This leech had found its way onto my arm. (591k)
Large Snail
Large snail. (582k)
Caterpillar
Caterpillar. (449k)
Caterpillar
Caterpillar. (792k)
Butterfly
Butterfly. (650k)
Junonia orithya
Blue Pansy butterfly (Junonia orithya). (530k)
Parthenos sylvia
Clipper butterfly (Parthenos sylvia, german: Blauer Segelfalter). (723k)
Lethe darena
Pearly-eye butterfly (Lethe darena). (565k)
Junonia atlites
Grey Pansy butterfly (Junonia atlites). (693k)
Ypthima horsfieldii
Malayan Five-ring butterfly (Ypthima horsfieldii). (621k)
Troides amphrysus
Malayan Birdwing butterfly (Troides amphrysus). (536k)
Papilio nephelus
Black-and-white Helen Swallowtail butterfly (Papilio nephelus). (525k)
Butterfly Showing Camouflaged Underside
Butterfly showing the camouflaged underside of its wings. (487k)
Sphingidae gen.
Close-up of a large Hawk Moth (Sphingidae gen., german: Schwärmer, french: Sphinx). (502k)
Eupterote asclepiades
Giant Lappet Moth (Eupterote asclepiades). (594k)
Theretra sp.
Moth (Theretra sp.). (431k)
Lyssa zampa
Tropical Swallowtail Moth (Lyssa zampa). (502k)
Lyssa zampa
Tropical Swallowtail Moth (Lyssa zampa). (725k)
Well Camouflaged Moth
Well camouflaged moth. (724k)
Ocypode sp.
Ghost Crab (Ocypode sp., french: Crabes fantômes). (717k)
Ghost Crab Coming Burrow
Ghost Crab coming out of its burrow. (715k)
Uca sp.
Fiddler Crab (Uca sp., german: Winkerkrabben, french: Crabes violonistes). They have this one large claw that they wave around to impress mates. (642k)
Fiddler Crab
Fiddler Crab. (745k)
Hermit Crab
Hermit Crab. (583k)
Crabs Mud Flats Kota
Crabs in the mud flats in Kota Kinabalu. You can see the eye stalks of several crabs in this picture, but not the crabs themselves. (404k)
Kurixalus chaseni
Shrub Frog (Kurixalus chaseni), endemic to Borneo. (465k)
Polypedates leucomystax
Common Tree Frog (Polypedates leucomystax). (439k)
Rhacophorus pardalis
Male Harlequin Tree Frog (Rhacophorus pardalis). (481k)
Rhacophorus pardalis
Female Harlequin Tree Frog (Rhacophorus pardalis). (369k)
Megophrys nasuta
Long-nosed Horned Frog, hiding (Megophrys nasuta, german: Zipfelkrötenfrosch, french: Grenouille cornue asiatique). (702k)
Megophrys nasuta
Long-nosed Horned Frog, sitting up (Megophrys nasuta, german: Zipfelkrötenfrosch, french: Grenouille cornue asiatique). They are very territorial and don't move much. I saw this one on two different days in the same place. (682k)
Gecko
Gecko. (791k)
Sphenomorphus sabanus
Sabah Slender Skink (Sphenomorphus sabanus), endemic to Borneo. (649k)
Bronchocela cristatella
Green Crested Lizard (Bronchocela cristatella). (656k)
Draco melanopogon
Black-barbed Flying Dragon (Draco melanopogon). I didn't see this one glide. (627k)
Gonocephalus bornensis
Borneo Forest Dragon (Gonocephalus bornensis, german: Winkelkopfagamen). It is endemic to Borneo. (743k)
Borneo Forest Dragon Notice
Borneo Forest Dragon. Notice the mosquito sitting below the eye. (576k)
Varanus salvator macromaculatus
Southeast Asian Water Monitor (Varanus salvator macromaculatus, german: Bindenwaran, french: Varan malais). (967k)
Swimming Southeast Asian Water
Swimming Southeast Asian Water Monitor. (878k)
Varanus salvator macromaculatus
Closer view of a Southeast Asian Water Monitor (Varanus salvator macromaculatus, german: Bindenwaran, french: Varan malais). (738k)
Small Snake
Small snake. (451k)
Small Snake
Small snake. (793k)
Small Snake
Small snake. (514k)
Tropidolaemus subannulatus
Bornean Keeled Green Pitviper (Tropidolaemus subannulatus). This one is venomous. (523k)
Snake Curled Tree
Snake curled up in a tree. (556k)
Small Fish
Small fish. (679k)
Fish Picking Food Pond
These fish were picking up food from the pond floor. In doing so, they would roll over and show their silvery belly (on the right). You could constantly see these bright flashes of light from the pond bottom. (664k)
Left Morning Turtle Laying
This is what was left in the morning of a turtle laying eggs. The rangers had removed all the eggs and put them in their hatchery. (839k)
Chelonia mydas
Green Sea Turtle (Chelonia mydas, german: Grüne Meeresschildkröte, french: Tortue verte) covering her nest with sand. (865k)
Green Sea Turtle Laying
Green Sea Turtle laying eggs. (528k)
Turtle Hatchery Each Clutch
Turtle hatchery. Each clutch of eggs is buried in the sand and surrounded by wire mesh to keep the young turtles from running away when they hatch. The rangers collect them in the night when they hatch and release them in the ocean. (1043k)
Baby Sea Turtle Scrambling
Baby sea turtle scrambling for the water. (997k)
Computer Display Egg Laying
Computer display of the egg laying and hatching statistics on the three turtle islands in the park. (362k)
Chaerephon plicatus
Bats emerging from their cave, on their way to foraging for insects (mostly Wrinkle-lipped Free-tailed Bats (Chaerephon plicatus, german: Freischwanzfledermäuse)). (661k)
Bats Emerging Cave
Bats emerging from their cave. (503k)
Bats Emerging Cave
Bats emerging from their cave. (522k)
Bats Resting During Day
Bats resting during the day. (763k)
Squirrel
Squirrel. (677k)
Callosciurus prevostii
Prevost's Squirrel (Callosciurus prevostii, german: Prevost-Hörnchen, french: Écureuil de Prévost). (800k)
Petaurista petaurista
Red Giant Flying Squirrel (Petaurista petaurista, german: Taguan). (608k)
Galeopterus variegatus
Sunda Flying Lemur (Galeopterus variegatus, german: Malaien-Gleitflieger, french: Galéopithèque de Temminck). This is no relation to the lemurs of Madagascar. (547k)
Cephalopachus bancanus borneanus
Bornean Tarsier (Cephalopachus bancanus borneanus, german: Sunda-Koboldmaki, french: Tarsier de Bornéo). Note the large eyes of this nocturnal animal. (508k)
Cephalopachus bancanus borneanus
Bornean Tarsier (Cephalopachus bancanus borneanus, german: Sunda-Koboldmaki, french: Tarsier de Bornéo). Note the long, skinny toes. (466k)
Paradoxurus hermaphroditus
Asian Palm Civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus, german: Fleckenmusang, french: Civette palmiste hermaphrodite). (704k)
Viverra tangalunga
Malayan Civet (Viverra tangalunga, german: Malaiische Zibetkatze). (736k)
Viverra tangalunga
Malayan Civet (Viverra tangalunga, german: Malaiische Zibetkatze). (698k)
Prionailurus javanensis sumatranus
Bornean and Sumatran Leopard Cat (Prionailurus javanensis sumatranus, german: Sundakatze). (623k)
Tragulus napu
Greater Mouse Deer (Tragulus napu, german: Großkantschil, french: Grand chevrotain malais). (877k)
Rusa unicolor brookei
Bornean Sambar Deer (Rusa unicolor brookei, german: Sambar, french: Sambar). (579k)
Macaca nemestrina
Sunda Pig-tailed Macaques (Macaca nemestrina, german: Südlicher Schweinsaffe, french: Macaque à queue de cochon des îles de la Sonde). (784k)
Macaca nemestrina
Sunda Pig-tailed Macaque (Macaca nemestrina, german: Südlicher Schweinsaffe, french: Macaque à queue de cochon des îles de la Sonde). (719k)
Macaca nemestrina
Sunda Pig-tailed Macaque (Macaca nemestrina, german: Südlicher Schweinsaffe, french: Macaque à queue de cochon des îles de la Sonde). (896k)
Macaca nemestrina
Sunda Pig-tailed Macaques (Macaca nemestrina, german: Südlicher Schweinsaffe, french: Macaque à queue de cochon des îles de la Sonde). They were very curious. This one tried to look into my window to see what was in there. But as soon as I moved inside, he ran away. (616k)
Close-up Macaques Either Pig-tailed
Close-up of one of the macaques (either pig-tailed or long-tailed). (455k)
Sunda Pig-tailed Macaques Climbing
Sunda Pig-tailed Macaques climbing up to their overnight tree. (866k)
Sunda Pig-tailed Macaques Climbing
Sunda Pig-tailed Macaques climbing up to their overnight tree. (1166k)
Sunda Pig-tailed Macaques Overnight
Sunda Pig-tailed Macaques in their overnight tree. (1187k)
Macaca fascicularis
Long-tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis, german: Javaneraffe, french: Macaque crabier). (745k)
Macaca fascicularis
Long-tailed Macaques (Macaca fascicularis, german: Javaneraffe, french: Macaque crabier). (889k)
Presbytis rubicunda
Maroon Leaf Monkey (Presbytis rubicunda, german: Maronenlangur, french: Semnopithèque rubicond). It is endemic to Borneo. (602k)
Presbytis rubicunda
Maroon Leaf Monkey (Presbytis rubicunda, german: Maronenlangur, french: Semnopithèque rubicond). Same species as previous one, different color morph. (596k)
Nasalis larvatus
Female Proboscis Monkey (Nasalis larvatus, german: Nasenaffe, french: Long-nez). It is endemic to Borneo. (693k)
Nasalis larvatus
Male Proboscis Monkey (Nasalis larvatus, german: Nasenaffe, french: Long-nez). (687k)
Male Proboscis Monkey
Male Proboscis Monkey. (684k)
Nasalis larvatus
Male Proboscis Monkey (Nasalis larvatus, german: Nasenaffe, french: Long-nez), screaming at competitors to defend his territory. (663k)
Nasalis larvatus
Male Proboscis Monkey (Nasalis larvatus, german: Nasenaffe, french: Long-nez), advertising his prowess by showing off his erect penis. (644k)
Proboscis Monkey Leaping Between
Proboscis Monkey leaping between trees. (658k)
Elephas maximus borneensis
Borneo Pygmy Elephants (Elephas maximus borneensis, german: Borneo-Zwergelefant, french: Éléphant de Bornéo). It is endemic to Borneo. (732k)
Elephas maximus borneensis
Borneo Pygmy Elephants (Elephas maximus borneensis, german: Borneo-Zwergelefant, french: Éléphant de Bornéo). (893k)

North Bornean Gray Gibbon (Hylobates funereus, german: Müller-Gibbon, french: Gibbon de Müller)

From the Müller's Bornean Gibbon entry in Wikipedia:

North Bornean Gray Gibbon (Hylobates funereus, german: Müller-Gibbon, french: Gibbon de Müller), also known as the grey gibbon, is a primate in the gibbon family, Hylobatidae. It is endemic to Borneo.

Unlike other gibbon species, North Bornean Gray Gibbon does not show sexual dimorphism in its fur coloration. Its fur is grey- or brown-colored with a ring of bright fur around its face. On the head, it often has a darkly colored cap. Weighing between 4-8 kg (9-18 lb), it ranks among the smaller of the gibbons.

North Bornean Gray Gibbon is endemic to the island of Borneo, inhabiting the northern and eastern part of the island.

2681
North Bornean Gray Gibbon (Hylobates funereus, german: Müller-Gibbon, french: Gibbon de Müller). It is endemic to Borneo. (800k)
3778
North Bornean Gray Gibbon (Hylobates funereus, german: Müller-Gibbon, french: Gibbon de Müller) starting a long leap. This and the next four pictures are a sequence showing a leaping Gibbon. (738k)
3782
Leaping Gibbon. (847k)
3783
Leaping Gibbon. (863k)
3784
Leaping Gibbon. (867k)
3785
Leaping Gibbon. (865k)

Northeast Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus morio, german: Borneo-Orang-Utan, french: Orang-outan de Bornéo)

From the Bornean Orangutan entry in Wikipedia:

The Northeast Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus morio, german: Borneo-Orang-Utan, french: Orang-outan de Bornéo) is a species of orangutan endemic to the island of Borneo. Together with the Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii, german: Sumatra-Orang-Utan, french: Orang-outan de Sumatra), it belongs to the only genus of great apes native to Asia. Like the other great apes, Orangutans are highly intelligent, displaying advanced tool use and distinct cultural patterns in the wild. Orangutans share approximately 97% of their DNA with humans.

The Northeast Bornean Orangutan is a critically endangered species, with deforestation, palm oil plantations and hunting posing a serious threat to its continued existence.

0884
Feeding Northeast Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus morio, german: Borneo-Orang-Utan, french: Orang-outan de Bornéo) in the Sepilok rehabilitation center. The long-tailed macaques are trying to steal some of the food. The Northeast Bornean Orangutan is endemic to Borneo. (630k)
0887
One of the macaques got the courage to grab a bite. (651k)
0966
Northeast Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus morio, german: Borneo-Orang-Utan, french: Orang-outan de Bornéo) at Sepilok. (736k)
1037
They use all arms and legs, one only for holding on, the other three for holding food. The baby has no problem hanging on either. (622k)
0986
Baby Northeast Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus morio, german: Borneo-Orang-Utan, french: Orang-outan de Bornéo). (925k)
0857
Baby Orangutan. This one came up to our raised walk way. (578k)
0856
Baby Orangutan on our raised walk way. (475k)
0932
Hangin' in there. (603k)
0991
They have long arms. (683k)
2155
Female Northeast Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus morio, german: Borneo-Orang-Utan, french: Orang-outan de Bornéo) feeding near the Abai Jungle Lodge. This one was in the wild, not a captive one. It was somewhat habituated to humans around the lodge, but not dependent on them. (938k)
2144
This is the detritus from her feeding under the tree. (612k)
3126
Orangutan tree nest. (1113k)
2770
Female Northeast Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus morio, german: Borneo-Orang-Utan, french: Orang-outan de Bornéo) Sheena with baby Danum. (902k)
2357
Big male Northeast Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus morio, german: Borneo-Orang-Utan, french: Orang-outan de Bornéo). When too many people got too close to his feeding tree, he started to charge us. Everybody scrambled away, you don't want to tangle with an irate big male Orangutan. I could understand that he was miffed at being stared at by 20 or so people, crowding around his tree. (770k)
2399
The crowd watching the male Orangutan. (761k)

This page contains 149 pictures with 56 species

Borneo
Main page for Borneo/Malaysia

Page last updated on Thu Oct 29 10:49:43 2020 (Mountain Standard Time)


Fauna in Borneo on guenther-eichhorn.com


© Dr. Günther Eichhorn
Retired
Email Guenther Eichhorn

*Dr. Günther Eichhorn Travel Website
*Soaring website