The historic center of Mexico City, also known as the Centro or Centro Histórico, is the central neighborhood in Mexico City, Mexico, focused on Zócalo or main plaza and extending in all directions for a number of blocks, with its farthest extent being west to the Alameda Central. The Zocalo is the largest plaza in Latin America. It can hold up to nearly 100,000 people.

This section of the capital lies in the municipal borough of Cuauhtémoc, has just over 9 km² (3.5 square miles) and occupies 668 blocks. It contains 9,000 buildings, 1,550 of which have been declared of historical importance. Most of these historic buildings were constructed between the 16th and 20th centuries. It is divided into two zones for preservation purposes. Zone A encompasses the pre-Hispanic city and its expansion from the Viceroy period until Independence. Zone B covers the areas all other constructions to the end of the 19th century that are considered indispensable to the preservation of the area's architectural and cultural heritage.

This is where the Spaniards began to build what is now modern Mexico City in the 16th century on the ruins of the conquered Tenochtitlán, capital of the Aztec Empire. As the center of the ancient Aztec Empire and the seat of power for the Spanish kingdom of New Spain, the Centro Historico contains most of the city's historic sites from both eras as well as a large number of museums.

Pictures from Tenochtitlán, the Aztec capital, are on the Tenochtitlán page.

The Historic Centre of Mexico City and Xochimilco is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

All pictures are © Dr. Günther Eichhorn, unless otherwise noted.

Historic Center of Mexico City

Mexico City Air
Mexico City from the air. (1170k)
Palacio De Bellas Artes
Palacio de Bellas Artes. (908k)
Side View Palacio De
Side view of the Palacio de Bellas Artes. (836k)
Convent Temple San Francisco
Convent and Temple of San Francisco (1710). (1071k)
Church San Felipe Neri
Church of San Felipe Neri. (1151k)
Buildings Historical District
Buildings in the historical district. (1126k)
Building Historical District
Building in the historical district. (1041k)
Building Historical District
Building in the historical district. (1059k)
Building Historical District
Building in the historical district. (1312k)
Building Historical District Beautiful
Building in the historical district with beautiful colored tile decoration. (1249k)
Building Historical District Beautiful
Building in the historical district with beautiful colored tile decoration. (1282k)
Lobby Best Western Hotel
Lobby of the Best Western Hotel Majestic in the historical district of Mexico City. (1032k)
Atrium Best Western Hotel
Atrium in the Best Western Hotel Majestic in the historical district of Mexico City. (1080k)
Staircase Best Western Hotel
Staircase of the Best Western Hotel Majestic in the historical district of Mexico City. (998k)

Metropolitan Cathedral and the Zócalo (Constitution Square)

Metropolitan Cathedral
Metropolitan Cathedral. (893k)
Metropolitan Cathedral
Metropolitan Cathedral. (988k)
Tabernacle Mexico City Metropolitan
Tabernacle of the Mexico City Metropolitan Cathedral. (1236k)
Decoration Cathedral
Decoration on the cathedral. (1206k)
Zócalo Night Getting Ready
Zócalo at night, getting ready for the Revolution Day celebration. (900k)
National Palace East Side
National Palace on the east side of the Zócalo. (654k)
Historic City Hall Zócalo
Historic City Hall on the Zócalo. (980k)
Huge Light Sculpture Over
Huge light sculpture over the Avenida 20 de Noviembre. (941k)

Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe

From the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe entry in Wikipedia:

The Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe (Spanish: Basílica de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe) is a Roman Catholic church, basilica, and National shrine of Mexico in the north of Mexico City which houses the cloak containing the image of Our Lady of Guadalupe. The 1709 shrine was built near the hill of Tepeyac, where the Virgin Mary is believed to have appeared to Saint Juan Diego Cuauhtlatoatzin. The basilica structure which now contains Diego's cloak was completed in 1974.

Officially known as the "Templo Expiatorio a Cristo Rey," the first structure of the old basilica was begun in 1695 and it was not finished until 1709. The major architect was Pedro de Arrieta. It is characterized by its doric interior and marble statues of Fray Juan de Zumárraga, archbishop at the time it was started, and Juan Diego, the peasant who saw the vision of the Virgin Mary. These are featured in the altarpiece that originally held the image of Our Lady of Guadalupe. (That altarpiece matches a similar one in the older chapel higher on the hill, which features the archangels Gabriel and Michael). The church was granted basilica status by Pope Pius X in 1904.

As much of Mexico City is built upon the dried lake bed of Lake Texcoco, the land was unstable and the old basilica was sinking. A new, more spacious basilica was built. The old one was closed for many years and repairs have recently finished. It is open to the public and perpetual adoration is held there. It is a very important place for Mexico City.

Front Old Basilica
Front of the old basilica. (1108k)
West Side Old Basilica
West side of the old basilica. (961k)
East Side Basilica Alley
East side of the basilica. The alley is sloping to the right, caused by the sinking of the buildings. (1051k)
Decorations Basilica Depicting Legend
Decorations on the basilica, depicting the legend of Our Lady of Guadalupe. (1402k)
Closer View Stone-carved Decoration
Closer view of the stone-carved decoration. (1392k)
Interior Old Basilica
Interior of the old basilica. (1145k)
Painting Old Basilica
Painting in the old basilica. (1053k)
Painting Old Basilica
Painting in the old basilica. (1110k)
Altar Old Basilica
Altar in the old basilica. (1163k)
Interior New Basilica
Interior of the new basilica. (1118k)
Painting Virgin Mary New
Painting of the Virgin Mary in the new basilica. (1019k)
Site Original Shrine Above
Site of the original shrine above the old basilica. (1013k)

Miscellaneous

Almoloya Del Rio Afternoon
Almoloya del Rio in the afternoon light. (770k)
Church Villahermosa
Church in Villahermosa. (709k)
Colorful Village Church Comalcalco
Colorful village church near Comalcalco. (919k)
Colorful Village Church Comalcalco
Colorful village church near Comalcalco. (819k)
Bicycle Rickshaw
Bicycle rickshaw. (1022k)
Rural Areas Tuktuks Common
In rural areas the tuktuks were common transportation. (1071k)
Transporting Big Picture Frame
Transporting a big picture frame on a motorcycle. (786k)
Huge Truck Trainns Common
One of the huge truck trainns that were common on the main highways. (543k)
Statue Tabscoop Last Maya
Statue of Tabscoop, the last Maya ruler in the area, after which the state Tabasco is named. (560k)
Bananas Important Part Agriculture
Bananas are an important part of agriculture in Tabasco. (1319k)
Individual Fruit Stands Banana
Individual fruit stands on the banana plants are wrapped in plastic to protect them from birds. (1163k)
Theobroma cacao
Cacao Tree (Theobroma cacao, german: Kakaobaum, french: Cacaoyer) with fruits. (1359k)
New Cacao Trees Grafted
New Cacao trees, grafted onto short root stock. (1.8M)
Cacao Flowers Young Fruits
Cacao flowers and young fruits. (849k)

People

Old Man
Old man. (824k)

This page contains 49 pictures with 1 species

Mexico
Main page for México

Page last updated on Wed Oct 28 14:36:35 2020 (Mountain Standard Time)


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